Download British Horror Cinema (British Popular Cinema) by Steve Chibnall, Julian Petley PDF

By Steve Chibnall, Julian Petley

ISBN-10: 0415230039

ISBN-13: 9780415230032

From no-budget to the Hammer studio, British Horror Cinema investigates a wealth of horror movies together with classics akin to Peeping Tom and The Wicker guy. members reflect on the Britishness of British horror and handle problems with censorship, the illustration of kin and of girls. in addition they research sub-genres corresponding to the portmanteau horror movie, and the paintings of key filmmakers together with John Gilling and Peter Walker.

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British Horror Cinema (British Popular Cinema)

From no-budget to the Hammer studio, British Horror Cinema investigates a wealth of horror motion pictures together with classics resembling Peeping Tom and The Wicker guy. members give some thought to the Britishness of British horror and tackle problems with censorship, the illustration of relations and of girls. in addition they learn sub-genres resembling the portmanteau horror movie, and the paintings of key filmmakers together with John Gilling and Peter Walker.

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Sample text

188) ‘There are no laughs in Witchfinder General’ These, then, were the various critical contexts within which The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) and its successors would find themselves judged, and it is hardly surprising that, as Peter Hutchings puts it: ‘the critical verdict on British horror during the time of its proliferation was overwhelmingly negative’ (1993: 4). Of course, by no means every review of every British horror film took violently against it; on the other hand the sheer vituperation spewed out year after year was absolutely nowhere offset by a positive engagement with these films in their own terms until the early 1970s, with the publication of Pirie’s A Heritage of Horror and his reviews of horror movies in Time Out and the Monthly Film Bulletin – by which time, of course, the genre was about to decline in Britain.

It was a degrading experience, by which I mean it made me feel dirty. As Charles Barr demonstrates in his seminal analysis of the critical savaging of Straw Dogs (which, significantly, remains banned on video in Britain), many British critics have severe problems in dealing with films in which the violence is not kept The British critics and horror cinema 37 Figure 7 ‘There are no laughs in Witchfinder General’: Vincent Price fails to raise a smile from Alan Bennett in Michael Reeves’s ‘sadistic and morally rotten film’.

It was a degrading experience, by which I mean it made me feel dirty. As Charles Barr demonstrates in his seminal analysis of the critical savaging of Straw Dogs (which, significantly, remains banned on video in Britain), many British critics have severe problems in dealing with films in which the violence is not kept The British critics and horror cinema 37 Figure 7 ‘There are no laughs in Witchfinder General’: Vincent Price fails to raise a smile from Alan Bennett in Michael Reeves’s ‘sadistic and morally rotten film’.

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British Horror Cinema (British Popular Cinema) by Steve Chibnall, Julian Petley


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